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Holy Trinity Blyghburgh. Cathedral of the Marches
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murdilka
Known as the Cathedral of the Marshes, Blythburgh was one of the earliest Christian sites in East Anglia. At the time of the Norman Conquest Blythburgh was part of the royal estate and had one of the richest churches in Suffolk, possibly a Saxon Minster, with two daughter churches.

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The church underwent a series of disasters, man-made and natural. The most dramatic of the latter variety came in August 1577, when a storm hit the area, and during morning service lightning hit the church (or was it Devil?)"cleft the door, and returning to the steeple rent the timber, brake the chimes, and fled towards Bongay, 6 miles off". The falling spire damaged the font and the roof (which wasn't repaired until 1782), destroying the angels in the west end bays. The door shows marks, which have the appearance of burns caused by candle flames, which the credulous associate with the devil's fingerprints. They have been associated with the 'Black Shuck' (Black Shuck is the East Anglian devil dog, the feared hound of the marshes) legend. Supposedly, a black dog ran through the church, killing two parishioners; he was seen the same day at St Mary, Bungay.

During the 17th century Holy Trinity was badly damaged when Parliament set out to remove what the puritans deemed to be superstitious ornamentation from churches; Blythburgh was assigned to William Dowsing, a local puritan, and on 8 April 1644 he went to the church and ordered the removal of "twenty superstitious pictures, one on the outside of the church; two crosses, one on the porch and another on the steeple; and twenty cherubim to be taken down in the church and chancel... and gave order to take down above 200 more within eight days".
Angel from the ceiling of Holy Trinity. Although this dismantling must have caused a sad loss to the church, especially if it involved the removal of medieval stained glass from the windows, it does not sound like ruthless destruction.

General neglect also played its part in the church's deterioration.


In 1962 the acoustic value of the building was discovered by Benjamin Britten, and some of the concerts of the Aldeburgh Festival are performed in the church.

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The modern sculpture representing the Holy Trinity

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At the east end, a curious series of initials in Lombardic script stretch across the outer chancel wall.

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The Virgin and the Child carved in oak by Peter Eugene Ball

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The shields held by the angels bear hte arms of Swillington, Ufford and Hopton names rooted deep in the history of Blyghburgh at the time of the building of the church. This angel is a replica and shows the original style of decoration

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Angel on the roof. Unfortunately it is out of focus:-(

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Carvings of the little figures on the bench ends - poppyheads. There are basically three series: the seven deadly sins, the seven works of mercy, and the four seasons. There are also angels bearing symbols of the Holy Trinity and the crown.

Hypocrisy

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Gluttony

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Holy Trinity

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The Jack-o'-the-Clock dates from around 1682 and one of only a few remaining in England.

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Красотень. Атмосферно так...

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